Windowsill Gardening

Check out these plants that are suitable for growing indoors


Just because it's winter outside does not mean your gardening days are over until spring. Any bright window can become the backdrop for a few small houseplants, herbs, lettuce or micro greens. Here are some of my tips on having a successful windowsill garden.

How to have a windowsill garden

Make sure you use pots that have a drainage hole so that they will drain well. Get a matching saucer to place under the pot to catch water, but don't allow any plant to sit in that water for too long. Use a well draining potting soil and place a piece of a paper towel or napkin over the drainage hole to keep the soil from running out until the roots have had a chance to grow.

Choose a south or east facing window, that gets a good amount of light the majority of the day and that is not obstructed by shear curtains or evergreens that will block light. In the summer, a south facing window may be too bright for most houseplants, but in the winter it is ideal. If you don't have enough natural light in your home, fluorescent lights can be very helpful. Put them on a timer for 8-12 hours a day based on what your plants seem to like best.

Windowsill Garden Tips from www.GardensAndCrafts.com

If your window does not have a large enough ledge to place the plants on, you can construct a shelf and mount it below the window, or you can just place a small table in front of the window to hold your plants. If you are lucky enough to have a bay window, even better.

Check to make sure the windows are not too drafty. Some plants may not be able to handle the cooler temps, so choose your plants wisely. You can always move the plants a few inches away from the window, but you would loose valuable light as well.

Choose smaller plants, or plants you have grown from seed or cuttings indoors. These plants will be able to withstand indoor conditions a lot better than a plant that has grown outdoors the entire summer before being brought inside for winter.

Since plants grow much more slowly indoors and when light sources are shorter and less intense, you don't want to make the mistake and over water your windowsill garden. Plants only need a lot of water when they are actively growing, such as during late spring and summer. A good rule of thumb for all plants, is to wait to water when the surface of the soil feels dry. Water well until water just starts to come out of the bottom of the pot. After a few minutes pour out any water that is left in the saucer. Never allow the plant roots to sit in water.

How to grow a windowsill garden during winter

Lack of humidity and airflow can also be a problem. You should mist the leaves of most plants once or twice a day. Plants will absorb moisture thru their leaves when their roots are not absorbing water as much. If you notice a fungus growing on the surface of the soil, reduce watering and place the plants under a ceiling fan or use an osculating fan near the plants a couple of hours a day.

Following are some plants that grow well inside based on the soil and light conditions that they like and what air temperatures they prefer.

Plants for low light and low moisture:

  • Snake Plant (Air temperatures between 50-75 degrees F)
  • Philodendron (Air temperatures between 50-80 degrees F)
  • Peperomia (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Areca Palm (Air temperatures between 65-75 degrees F)
  • Zeezee Plant (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Cast-Iron Plant - Winter (Air temperatures between 45-85 degrees F)

Plants for low light and more moisture:

  • English Ivy (Air temperatures between 55-70 degrees F)
  • Arrowhead Vine (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Cast-Iron Plant - Summer (Air temperatures between 45-85 degrees F)
  • Calathea (Air temperatures between 65-75 degrees F)

Plants a lot of light and more moisture:

  • Spider Plant (Air temperatures between 65-75 degrees F)
  • Diffenbachia (Air temperatures between 65-75 degrees F)
  • Peace Lily (Air temperatures between 50-80 degrees F)
  • Boston Fern (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)

Plants for a lot of light and low moisture:

  • Pothos (Air temperatures between 50-70 degrees F)
  • Succulents (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Aloe (Air temperatures around 70 degrees F)
  • Hoya (Air temperatures between 55-75 degrees F)
  • Jade Plant (Air temperatures around 60-70 degrees F)
  • Shamrock Plant (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Crown of Thorns (Air temperatures between 55-75 degrees F)
  • Dracanea (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • Zeezee Plant (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)
  • African Violet - (Air temperatures between 60-75 degrees F)

Following are some herbs that can grow really well indoors.

Allow the soil to dry out slightly between watering and don't allow the roots to sit in water:

  • Chervil - low light, air temperatures between 65-75 degrees F
  • Oregano - south facing window, 65-75 degrees F
  • Parsley - east or west facing window, 65-75 degrees F
  • Rosemary - south facing window, 65-75 degrees F
  • Sage - south facing window, 65-75 degrees F
  • Thyme - east or west facing window, 65-75 degrees F

Micro greens also grow well indoors. Check out this article on how to grow micro greens.

Back to Top

Growing Vegetables in Containers

Learn which vegetables grow well in containers and how to get the most produce from your container grown plants.
Read more...

Seed Saving Tips

Save money by learning how to properly harvest and save your own seeds.
Read more...


The information contained in this web site is strictly the opinion of the administrators and does not offer any warranties based on the information contained in these pages. We try to provide quality information, but we make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in or linked to this web site.

Our site contains affiliate links to Amazon. If you purchase a product after clicking on one of these links, we will be paid a small commission. These commissions help to keep our site free to use.

All photographs are the property of www.gardensandcrafts.com and cannot be reproduced in any way without written permission from the administrators of this site.

Copyright © 2005-2016 D&G Gardens and Crafts 5 Chester Lane, Pennellville, NY 13132. All rights reserved.
Website Designed by Dorothy Baltz